Swimming.

"A member of the Goucher College swim team competes during a meet against Catholic University Saturday, October 29, 2011 at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland."

I shot the swim meet at Goucher College this weekend. Here’s one I liked. It’s tough for me to get into shooting swimming, but that’s likely just because the light in Goucher’s pool is abysmal. 

I’d be curious to see what shooting is like in, say, an Olympic pool.

Photos: Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K Baltimore

"A volunteer is made up to resemble a zombie at the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"A racer jumps into a 'blood pit,' one of the obstacles on the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"A zombie screams at a racer during the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"A zombie chases a racer during the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"A racer swims across a lake, one of the obstacles on the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"Zombies wait for racers to arrive during the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"A zombie screams at the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"Twin brothers observe racers as they compete in the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"A mother walks with her daughter, disguised as a zombie, at the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

"Racers dressed as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles celebrate after completing the course at the first ever Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K race Saturday, October 22, 2011 in Darlington, Maryland."

I was hired as the photographer for the first ever “Run For Your Lives Zombie 5K” race, which was held in Darlington, Maryland last Saturday. This was just the first of a series of several to occur throughout the country this year and next, so I was absolutely surprised to see that this drew attention from national media outlets, as well as over 10,000 runners and volunteers dressed like zombies. Here is the link to the website I shot for, which gives a better explanation of what the race is all about. 

As a Goucher graduate, I’ve taken pictures of zombies plenty of times, but even after shooting this event, I still don’t understand the obsession people have with the concept of zombies chasing humans. It just doesn’t get me going whatsoever, but it does make for very entertaining, compelling pictures.

I shot a ton of pictures. I guess that will happen when you’re running around in the woods and trodding through mud up to your ankles while taking pictures of the same thing over and over again for 14 hours straight…

Regardless, I’m really happy with my pictures from the day, which will make good additions to the portfolio. This is a sample of some of my favorites. 

If you’d like, click each image to see them full screen. They look better that way. 

Goalie.

"Goucher College Senior goalkeeper Steve Baum watches the ball as it passes him for a goal during a men's soccer game against Susquehanna University Saturday, October 15, 2011 at Goucher College."

I must have missed it the first time I went through my images from last Saturday’s soccer game at Goucher College, but I caught this quick moment after a second glance through today. 

Sorry, Baum, for posting this, but apart from the fact that it’s you in the photo, it stands on its own as a nice shot. Oy, no pun intended there.

Goucher Tennis.

"Goucher Men's Tennis freshman Nick Pelensky follows through on a serve during a match against Penn State-Harrisburg Friday, October 14, 2011 at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland."

I shot the Goucher Men’s and Women’s tennis match last Friday for the Goucher Athletics department. It was nice to be back on my home turf, see people I haven’t seen in awhile, and test out my new 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, which I’m still getting used to. 

Here’s one that I thought was interesting. 

Reflections: Year two at the Baltimore Orioles

"Baltimore Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis hits a home run during a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians Saturday, July 16, 2011."

I’m here at the yard for the last day of my second year as a photographer for the Baltimore Orioles. What can I say? It was another amazing summer consumed by two of my favorite things in life: photography and baseball. 

I did a lot this year. Since I got here in mid-June, I shot 30 home games. I also traveled with players to various community outreach events throughout Baltimore City and County. Many of my photographs were published in this year’s third edition of Orioles Magazine, as well as several Baltimore newspapers and community publications. I also worked tirelessly on the Orioles photography archives, which are in the ridiculously long process of being categorized and converted to digital format. Over these past several months, I scanned, in their entirety, the files of 60 players dating back to 1954. In total, I scanned over 4,000 images, but likely closer to 4,500. I also fulfilled image requests from other departments, local media outlets, and other teams throughout the league. 

It’s a little bittersweet now that it’s over. I love every second of being out there on the field right where the action is, and for me, shooting the games never gets old. At the same time, though, this job is intense, and can be extremely time consuming. Needless to say, I’m excited for a bit of a break after lots of hard work. I also know that I won’t miss much action during the offseason (besides the annoying sound of the scanners next to my computer all day long.)

What I will miss, of course, are the people who make this such an incredible experience for me. I owe my most sincere thanks to Todd Olszewski, the team photographer, for calling me back this year, imparting his photo expertise on me, and constantly inspiring me with his work. I also owe thanks to all the photographers I work alongside at each game for making work such an enjoyable place to come to every day, and for their advice and wisdom about this profession. 

I’m not quite sure what’s next, but I know something great will come up. Until then, here’s to two seasons!

Dino.

"Baltimore Orioles second baseman Robert Andino hits a walk off RBI single in the bottom of the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox Wednesday, September 28, 2011 in Baltimore. The Orioles won 4-3, eliminating Boston from making the playoffs."

"Baltimore Orioles second baseman Robert Andino walks leaves the field after hitting an RBI walk off single in the bottom of the ninth inning to defeat the Boston Red Sox Wednesday, September 28, 2011 in Baltimore."

In 2009, on my last day as an intern with the Baltimore Orioles, Nolan Reimold hit an eleventh inning walk-off home run to give the Orioles a 5-4 win on the final game of the season. I remember that day perfectly. What better way to end a fantastic internship than a feel-good win to send me off?

Last Wednesday, nearly two years to the date of that last game in 2009, the Orioles again ended their season in dramatic, walk-off fashion, as Robert Andino hit a ninth inning walk-off RBI single to knock the Boston Red Sox out of the playoffs. 

I don’t want to sound old, but in all my years of playing, watching, and shooting baseball games, this is among the most memorable. The circumstances couldn’t have been scripted any better. The first shot here is Andino’s winning hit. The second is of him alone in the dugout after all the other players had cleared into the locker room. But for how much I’ll always remember that night as a whole, what happened in between these two moments is a complete blur to me. I always try to shoot without emotion, but in this case, that was just impossible. 

My celebration shots are garbage, to put it bluntly, but I was happy to capture this quieter moment in the midst of chaos. Dino has always been one of my favorites since I’ve been here. He’s not the biggest guy out there, but I’ve always loved his hustle. 

This last game’s “Thing I Learned:” It’s nights like this that make taking photos so enjoyable. 

Baltimore Orioles Photography: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 vs. Boston Red Sox

"Baltimore Orioles first baseman Mark Reynolds is tagged out at home by Boston Red Sox catcher Ryan Lavarnway in the fifth inning of a baseball game in Baltimore."

"Baltimore Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis looks on in the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox Wednesday, September 28, 2011 in Baltimore."

Here’s two that I liked from Wednesday night’s dramatic final game of the season. These were taken, of course, before the ridiculous 9th inning walk off win, which I’ll show in a separate post. 

A broken bat shot.

"Baltimore Orioles catcher Matt Wieters breaks his bat in the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox Tuesday, September 27, 2011 in Baltimore."

I’ve been waiting all season for one of these to happen. Go figure it took me until game 161 to get it. I wish the bat had broken more, because I was all over this at-bat. This doesn’t look like much as far as broken-bat shots go, but I’m still happy I got one. 

Baltimore Orioles Video Highlight Reel: My Time

Here’s my first video work published for the Baltimore Orioles. This video ran on the scoreboard at Camden Yards between innings throughout the last month of the season. 

I owe a special thanks to Ben Epstein of Orioles Productions for his killer editing of this reel. Not all of the clips that appear in this video are mine, but most of them are. It’s a combination of footage I shot handheld with my Canon 7D and footage shot by the television camera crew. 

As for what to look for, I shot about every photo that appears in the opening montage, and my video clips have a more handheld look and play with focus and depth of field a lot more. I’d say they make for about 80% of the video. 

It feels great to have gotten some video published this season, and it was always wild to see my own work up on the scoreboard during games.