Photos: President Obama Speaks in Manchester, New Hampshire.

“President Barack Obama greets supporters at a campaign event at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Manchester, New Hampshire Thursday, October 18, 2012.”

“President Barack Obama pauses while speaking at a campaign event at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Manchester, New Hampshire Thursday, October 18, 2012.”

“A supporter holds up a campaign sign as President Barack Obama speaks at campaign event at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Manchester, New Hampshire Thursday, October 18, 2012.”

“Supporters await the arrival of President Barack Obama at a campaign event at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Manchester, New Hampshire Thursday, October 18, 2012.”

“Supporters await the arrival of President Barack Obama at a campaign event at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Manchester, New Hampshire Thursday, October 18, 2012.”

Yesterday, I had the privilege of covering my first Presidential appearance. I haven’t covered politics on a national scale like this before, so I didn’t quite know what to expect as I drove up to the Veteran’s Memorial Park in Manchester, New Hampshire. That was part of the fun of it.

My access was limited to the media riser directly in front of where President Obama was speaking, so I didn’t have much freedom to roam through the site. Still, I tried to work some different angles a move around to mix things up a bit after I got the head-on shots of the President that I needed. 

All in all, I’m pretty happy with what I got for the first go around. I’d love to continue to work these type of events in the future. Regardless of your political beliefs, being in close proximity with the POTUS is pretty exciting.

Here is a link to my full take from the event on the Boston University News Service photo account. 

Obama’s newest threats: Sanger speaks on media, unrest in Middle East

"David E. Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, addresses an audience in the Hyman Forum of the Athenaeum at Goucher College Thursday, April 14, 2011."

I’m a little over three weeks away from my last day of classes at Goucher College, and about five weeks from graduation. I’ve certainly reached the point where everything that’s happening here seems all too familiar. As for photography, at least, I’ve shot every angle on this campus that there is to shoot. 

There’s still an undeniable feeling of nostalgia, though, as these final weeks rush by. I remind myself not to get caught up in those ‘I’m so over it’ thoughts, and to not lose sight of the things I’ve loved about this place. 

One of those is the speakers that come to this campus. It’s particularly helpful as a journalist, given the frequent visits we have by professional reporters and editors from the world’s leading media outlets. It’s a nice compliment to what we’re taught in class and what we live through in our actual journalistic experiences. 

I asked David E. Sanger, the chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, my usual cliché question: “What’s your advice for a young journalist?”

His answer has stuck with me, particularly in these weeks which have seemed to revolve around nothing but internships, jobs, and careers. 

“If you go into the industry with an understanding that you are not there as a newspaper reporter, but as a processor and interpreter of data – writing about it, explaining it in front of a camera, doing it on audio, talking about it on television – it’s all of these technologies converging. If you go into it like that, then it’s incredibly satisfying. And what’s the most satisfying part? You get up every morning and you don’t know what’s going to happen. That’s a pretty good thing. And the second thing is you get up every morning and you’re still excited about the work. I know more journalists who get up in the morning excited and thrilled to go into work than I do in almost any other field,” he said. 

State of the Union – Boring, but good message for us graduating folk

"Early morning observers gather on the World War II Memorial in Washington D.C. Tuesday, January 20, 2009 to await the Inauguration Speech of President Barack Obama."

Here I sit a week later writing about a State of the Union speech that I can barely recall any details about. President Obama chose his words wisely, safely appealing to both Republicans and Democrats while largely avoiding clear and specific policy proposals.

I have to say, it was pretty boring.

But the young, soon-to-graduate-from-college-and-not-exactly-sure-what-he’s-going-to-do-next-yet-strangely-not-worried-at-all kid inside of me resonated with one talking point in an otherwise very long hour of watching.

“Half a century ago, when the Soviets beat us into space with the launch of a satellite called Sputnik, we had no idea how we’d beat them to the moon,” said President Obama, calling for job-creation throughout various fields of science. “The science wasn’t there yet. NASA didn’t even exist. But after investing in better research and education, we didn’t just surpass the Soviets; we unleashed a wave of innovation that created new industries and millions of new jobs.”

“This is our generation’s Sputnik moment,” he added.

Hey people who are finishing up college this year, this is our “Sputnik moment.” Let’s get excited about going into the world. We’re young. We’re smart. We’re energetic. We’re hip.

A rough job market? No worries. Let’s change it.