Grinding towards graduation.

 

"A dog stands at the ready before chasing a ball on Kappa Field at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida Sunday, March 13, 2011."

I’m glad to be back on the blog after a brief hiatus during an otherwise extremely productive Spring Break. I did get to spend a weekend relaxing and playing tennis in Florida. This photograph is obviously nothing special, but I decided to post it so that I have a record of the trip.

Besides those two lazy days, though, I took advantage of the time off to continue working on the various projects and commitments I’m involved in this semester.

Today marks the beginning of a final push towards graduation from Goucher College in approximately eight weeks. The Q, the courts, the classroom, the Senior Thesis, and the planning for life after Goucher are all in full swing (awful pun intended).

There’s no doubt it’s going to be a grind, but I’m focused and I’ll do my best to enjoy every second of it.

Goucher College alumnus speaks on American housing crisis

 

"Paul Reyes, author of "Exiles in Eden: Life Among the Ruins of Florida’s Great Recession," discusses his book's development in Buchner Hall at Goucher College Tuesday, February 8, 2011."

Last Tuesday night was one of those moments when academics and athletics collided for me. I had a late night tennis practice off campus, so I was only able to stay for the first ten minutes of Paul Reyes‘ lecture on the American housing crisis and snap a few quick photographs.

Read the full story here.

Because I had to leave so early, I don’t have many thoughts on what he had to say about the state of housing itself.

What I did pick up on was how his career as a journalist influenced the production of his book. He mentioned that although he had no formal education in economics or real estate prior to writing his book, his regular reporting and speaking with people in Florida affected by foreclosures gave him a more personalized angle.

I don’t know much about literary journalism, but it was interesting to hear how a journalist can mold lots of pieces of information together into one cohesive body of work.