Obama’s newest threats: Sanger speaks on media, unrest in Middle East

"David E. Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, addresses an audience in the Hyman Forum of the Athenaeum at Goucher College Thursday, April 14, 2011."

I’m a little over three weeks away from my last day of classes at Goucher College, and about five weeks from graduation. I’ve certainly reached the point where everything that’s happening here seems all too familiar. As for photography, at least, I’ve shot every angle on this campus that there is to shoot. 

There’s still an undeniable feeling of nostalgia, though, as these final weeks rush by. I remind myself not to get caught up in those ‘I’m so over it’ thoughts, and to not lose sight of the things I’ve loved about this place. 

One of those is the speakers that come to this campus. It’s particularly helpful as a journalist, given the frequent visits we have by professional reporters and editors from the world’s leading media outlets. It’s a nice compliment to what we’re taught in class and what we live through in our actual journalistic experiences. 

I asked David E. Sanger, the chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, my usual cliché question: “What’s your advice for a young journalist?”

His answer has stuck with me, particularly in these weeks which have seemed to revolve around nothing but internships, jobs, and careers. 

“If you go into the industry with an understanding that you are not there as a newspaper reporter, but as a processor and interpreter of data – writing about it, explaining it in front of a camera, doing it on audio, talking about it on television – it’s all of these technologies converging. If you go into it like that, then it’s incredibly satisfying. And what’s the most satisfying part? You get up every morning and you don’t know what’s going to happen. That’s a pretty good thing. And the second thing is you get up every morning and you’re still excited about the work. I know more journalists who get up in the morning excited and thrilled to go into work than I do in almost any other field,” he said. 

Strategic default: Man walks away from his Baltimore rowhouse and the mortgage, joining the ranks of “strategic defaulters” – Baltimore Sun Video

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Although I didn’t shoot footage for this video myself, this was my last assignment a Multimedia Intern for The Baltimore Sun. I spent several days editing this footage from reporter Jamie SmithHopkins, who wrote about Wallace Farmer’s unique story. It can be read here in its entirety.

This was the most difficult yet most rewarding editing job I had during my time there. I’m proud of myself for making sense of over two hours of interview footage and condensing it down to a fluid short story.

Though I didn’t realize it then, I think the reason I’m so satisfied with this video is because, at the time I was working on it, I could relate to Mr. Farmer in a strange way: both of us were men walking away from something we loved. For him, it was a home that he hoped to spend many more years in.

For me, it was another incredible learning experience.

Under the guidance and expertise of the Multimedia department, I worked on numerous projects and had various responsibilities throughout the summer. Primarily, I shot, edited, and produced video and photographs for breaking stories in the news, features, sports, and arts sections of the newspaper. I conducted interviews and created and pitched story ideas to editors and reporters. Additionally, I updated the newspaper’s website with photos, videos, and multimedia slideshows.

I never felt like an intern. From day one, I was given significant responsibilities and assigned to cover newsworthy stories. I was included in news meetings and was always encouraged to contribute my thoughts.

I’m confident that the multimedia skills I learned will benefit me as I pursue a career in journalism. I was lucky to work alongside some of the best journalists in the business, and I’m thankful for all that I learned from them.

Most importantly, I thank my Mom and Dad, family, and friends. Without their love, support, and guidance, none of this would have been possible.

Thank you to Professor David Zurawik for helping me secure this internship, and for his inspirational teaching and unyielding encouragement and motivation.

Thank you to Mary Corey and Sam Davis for ensuring that I had an enjoyable and productive internship experience.

Thank you to the my Editor, Steve Sullivan, and the Multimedia Department, Chris Assaf, Kevin Richardson, and Leeann Adams, for showing me the ropes, breaking me in, giving me feedback and criticism, and involving me in their daily routines.

Thank you to my fellow interns Kirby Mills, Kate Klots, Gabby Siskind, Colin Stevens, and Kate Smith, whom I had the pleasure of getting to know, reporting with, and learning from.

And to everyone else who helped me along the way!