Obama’s newest threats: Sanger speaks on media, unrest in Middle East

"David E. Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, addresses an audience in the Hyman Forum of the Athenaeum at Goucher College Thursday, April 14, 2011."

I’m a little over three weeks away from my last day of classes at Goucher College, and about five weeks from graduation. I’ve certainly reached the point where everything that’s happening here seems all too familiar. As for photography, at least, I’ve shot every angle on this campus that there is to shoot. 

There’s still an undeniable feeling of nostalgia, though, as these final weeks rush by. I remind myself not to get caught up in those ‘I’m so over it’ thoughts, and to not lose sight of the things I’ve loved about this place. 

One of those is the speakers that come to this campus. It’s particularly helpful as a journalist, given the frequent visits we have by professional reporters and editors from the world’s leading media outlets. It’s a nice compliment to what we’re taught in class and what we live through in our actual journalistic experiences. 

I asked David E. Sanger, the chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, my usual cliché question: “What’s your advice for a young journalist?”

His answer has stuck with me, particularly in these weeks which have seemed to revolve around nothing but internships, jobs, and careers. 

“If you go into the industry with an understanding that you are not there as a newspaper reporter, but as a processor and interpreter of data – writing about it, explaining it in front of a camera, doing it on audio, talking about it on television – it’s all of these technologies converging. If you go into it like that, then it’s incredibly satisfying. And what’s the most satisfying part? You get up every morning and you don’t know what’s going to happen. That’s a pretty good thing. And the second thing is you get up every morning and you’re still excited about the work. I know more journalists who get up in the morning excited and thrilled to go into work than I do in almost any other field,” he said. 

Phi Beta Kappa hosts discussion on revolution, social media

 

"Panelists field a question from the audience during a discussion titled "Revolution In 140 Characters: How The Internet/Social Media Are Affecting Global Politics" at Goucher College Monday, April 12, 2011."

Last night, I attended a panel discussion hosted by Goucher College’s chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, which I was recently elected into.

Among the panelists was my academic advisor and mentor, Dr. John Turner, who is always a pleasure to listen to. He and the other panelists spoke about the advantages and potentially harmful effects that the Internet and social media have in shifting global politics and in creating revolution. It’s a topic that couldn’t be more relevant, given all that’s transpired in the world over the past several months.

That’s why it was such a shame that this discussion was so poorly attended. That was to be expected, though, as it was scheduled at the same time as a lecture across campus by Jean-Michel and Céline Cousteau, the son and granddaughter of renowned oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau.

I had my camera with me so I grabbed some nice shots. I was most pleased with this one.

Goucher College Video: Baltimore taxes not to be raised after $65 million budget cut

Here’s our first project for the production phase of a New Media class I’m enrolled in at Goucher College this semester. Our assignment was to shoot, edit, and produce a one-minute video newscast about Baltimore’s recent budget cuts proposed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

After we had our script finalized, production on this video went relatively quickly. It was nice to get away from Goucher’s campus for an afternoon and shoot footage in the city, and it was also a good chance for me to experiment with shooting video on my Canon still for the first time.

I took this as an enjoyable throwback to my summer multimedia internship at The Baltimore Sun, during which time I went out into Baltimore every day, shot videos like this, and prepared them for the web. The skills that I learned while I was there have been invaluable, not just for this project, but for the entire collection of multimedia work I’ve done since then.

Looking at this video with fresh eyes, I’ve caught a few minor details that could be tweaked, but this was a true group effort, and the results are superb for our first project.